Friday, January 19, 2018
Written by Timothy B. Smith

Our Family Cruise in Pictures

Earlier this week, I promised to share some of my favorite photos from the cruise. This was only the second time I’d taken my camera on a trip, and as you might be able to tell, much to learn I still have.

I took over 700 pictures. Many of those pictures were extremely overexposed, and another big chunk were completely out of focus. Unfortunately, there are many moments I thought I captured, but realized I didn’t.

Camera: Canon EOS T7i
Lens: Sigma 18-35mm ƒ/1.8

Here are some of my favorites shots from the trip.

Kelly on deck sixteen Denver on catamaran Darren making a face Arlene on deck sixteen Julian on the beach Rafa talking about soccer Ethan on the catamaran Arlene not happy at my picture taking Kelly magazine cover picture Dawson on the beach Ethan on the beach
Written by Timothy B. Smith

Warm Winter Day

I took some pictures of my cousin today. It was a gorgeous 40º, which is much warmer than when we left on vacation just a week ago.

I took these at around sunset, so the light was perfect.

Camera: Canon EOS T7i
Lens: Sigma 18-35mm ƒ/1.8

Matthew looking cold

Matthew looking cold

Matthew looking cold

Wednesday, January 17, 2018
Tuesday, January 16, 2018
Written by Timothy B. Smith

The New CSS Layout

The New CSS Layout by Rachel Andrew. Photo taken in Cozumel, Mexico.

If you’ve been working on the web for the past few years, you’ve noticed how quickly our layout tools have improved. I gave four talks last year on CSS Grid. In just 2017, the feature went from being behind flags to having support in most modern browsers.

The New CSS Layout by Rachel Andrew provides a comprehensive summary of the history of layout, what tools we have at our disposal right now, and where we’re heading. Her explanation of why and how to get involved in the making of CSS is the rallying cry I think our industry needs.

While some complain incessantly about their frustrations with CSS and how it’s somehow a “better idea” to write CSS in JS, Rachel provides us with a constructive way to better how CSS works. Turns out, that to be part of creating the future of CSS, you can create an issue on GitHub and describe your particular use case of a new feature. In other words, you have to truly care. Writing a whiny article on Medium with a click-bait headline doesn’t count.

Rachel dedicates a good portion of this book teaching us how to use the tools we currently have the right way. As part of my own talk on CSS Grid addresses, we’ve been using features like floats and even flexbox as hacks for what CSS Grid came to fix. A crucial part in us improving the layouts we create will be rewriting the parts of our brain that had learned the wrong way.

I came away from this book with a new found feeling of joy. I’m so happy and grateful I get to build websites for a living. Learning these new tools is what makes the job so exciting to me. I love that if I truly want to make a difference in how these tools work, that ability is easily within my reach.

Most of all, this book is dogma and judgement free. We’ve been doing things wrong, but we were doing our best with the tools we had. Rachel explains the better way without making me feel stupid, which I appreciate.

If you haven’t already, I recommend you add this book to your reading list. It’s well worth it.

Written by Timothy B. Smith

Caribbean Cruise: Winter 2018

Seven days of family time, great food, sunshine, and gorgeous ocean water

I’m back from our family cruise, and holy moly did that week go by quick! Eighteen members of my family and Kelly’s went on this amazing cruise. I took my camera on the trip, so I’ll share some of my favorite shots with you in the next few days.

I want to give a huge thank you to TJ Draper for blog-sitting in my absence. He did an excellent job.

Now, back to work.