Andrew Wilkinson on Building a Lifestyle Business

Andrew Wilkinson talks about being In-N-Out Burger instead of becoming McDonalds. It’s quite encouraging to read something like this from someone who’s had so much success in our industry. Here’s my favorite part of the article:

Meanwhile, there are thousands of internet businesses out there, quietly making tens, and even hundreds of millions of dollars, who have taken the same path as In-N-Out. They don’t need to be first, second, or even tenth, in their space, and have instead chosen to focus on a small percent of a massive market. They answer to customers, not investors, and focus on making their employees, customers, and themselves happy.

‘On Productivity’

Brian Krogsgard:

I should admit something: I have almost no such hacks and I do not focus heavily on my processes and how to streamline them.

Now, I do think I’m a fairly productive person. I get a lot done during the day. Since I started my own business, I tend to balance the day with research, writing (which is what pays bills, if you will), customer support, site maintenance, and development.

I love this post by Brian. We can get caught up in all of these things that you “should be doing to be productive” instead of doing what works for you.

The Verge Reviews Big Sean’s Latest Album

It’s the little things, the avoidable mistakes, that stand out on Dark Sky Paradise. It’s a great album, but it could have been a classic. It has all the ingredients; a capable artist, excellent production, a clear theme and direction, and the potential for multiple hits. This is the album that is supposed to propel Big Sean into the upper echelon of rap. He’s closer, but Dark Sky Paradise won’t get Big Sean a seat at the table. (Kanye, Drake, Jay Z, and Kendrick Lamar are sitting at the table. Sorry, but this is not up for debate. Your argument will not be accepted.) Big Sean is definitely on his way. He just still has some work to do.

A surprisingly great review of Dark Sky Paradise.

‘Deploy a Password Protected Jekyll Site on Heroku with Dropbox’

Dave Rupert:

At Paravel, we frequently run into issues where we need to share password protected sites with clients. We could setup some complicated post-commit hook/Capistrano system, or pin ourselves to a certain SaaS provider, but none of those have sat well with us and seem overly complicated.

We need a workflow that is flexible, almost disposable, and could even show a different “experimental” branch at a whim. We’ve come across something relatively simple that uses Dropbox to sync a Jekyll site to Heroku.

Such a good idea! Thanks Uncle Dave!

Post Status Reviews Layers by Obox

Brian Krogsgard:

I am definitely not on the bandwagon for page builders, though it seems the WordPress product world is. Where traditional options heavy theme sales have died away, page builders have risen from their ashes.[…]

I’m afraid, however, that end user “demand” may make it so whether I like it or not; but it won’t be for their own good. I think there is a better way. I think “page building”, as it seems we’ve standardized the term, is broken when too many granular design elements are allowed. Instead, I’d like to see content building, where structured content can be created with a tool, but theming and styles are still left to, well, themes.

Lots of things I wanted to quote here, but just go read this. Brian, as per usual, gives excellent insights.

‘Don’t Snuggle Your Space Heater, And Other Tips For Surviving Winter’

Lauren Evans on Gothamist:

Your oven can be used for more than just storage! Pull out all the sweaters and board games typically shelved in your oven, and preheat it to 425 degrees. Insert a baking sheet lined with clumps of some sort of batter—it doesn’t matter what kind. What matters is that your oven is essentially a second heater, and will warm up your space accordingly. Depending on what you’re baking, it will probably also smell good! Unfortunately, you have to turn it off when your Baked Good of choice is done, or else it will catch fire and kill you or poison you with carbon monoxide.

A funny guide on how to survive the winter. I think many of us might be sick of it already, especially those in the Northeast.

‘Another Week; Another Debate About Podcasts’

Stephen Hackett:

I’d rather people listen a little faster and consume more of our content than hear every single beat, as it comes out of Logic.

Personally, I don’t care how people listen to my shows as long as they’re listening. This sentence from Marco’s article, explains it perfectly:

I don’t want sugar in my coffee, but it won’t impact my enjoyment of my coffee if you put sugar in yours.

I don’t personally listen to podcasts at a faster speed, but who the hell am I to tell you how you should listen?